CT Lung Screening - Cardinal Points Imaging | Raleigh, NC
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Low-dose CT Lung Screening

Lung cancer can be serious. Symptoms of lung cancer are often mistaken for other problems, such as an infection or effects from smoking, or sometimes don’t appear until the disease is already at an advanced, non-curable stage. If lung cancer is found at an earlier stage, people have a better chance of living longer.

Because CT Lung Screenings can detect even very small nodules in the lung, they are especially effective for diagnosing lung cancer at its earliest, most treatable stage.

Who should get a lung screening?

CT Lung Screening is for high-risk people who meet the following criteria:

  • Are age 50 or older who currently smoke or have quit within the last 15 years
  • Have a smoking history that is the equivalent of 1 pack/day for 20 years
  • Have experienced asbestos exposure or have obstructive airway disease
  • Have a smoking history and additional risk factors such as radon exposure, occupational exposures, COPD, and pulmonary fibrosis
  • Are not experiencing symptoms related to lung cancer

What you should know about CT Lung Screening

The Lung Screening exam detects lung cancer in its earliest stages when it is most treatable. It consists of a low dose, non-contrasted CT that uses X-rays to scan the entire chest in about five to ten seconds during a single breath hold. It takes about 15 minutes to complete.

CT Lung Screening is for high-risk people who meet the following criteria:

  • Are age 50 or older who currently smoke or have quit within the last 15 years
  • Have a smoking history that is the equivalent of 1 pack/day for 20 years
  • Have experienced asbestos exposure or have obstructive airway disease
  • Have a smoking history and additional risk factors such as radon exposure, occupational exposures, COPD, and pulmonary fibrosis
  • Are not experiencing symptoms related to lung cancer

Individuals must consult with a referring provider to determine if they qualify for the exam

A valid order is required to schedule the study

Yes, Medicare and most health insurance plans cover the CT Lung Screening exam. Check with your insurance plan for specific qualifying information.

Qualified patients without insurance can get the exam by paying the discounted uninsured cash-pay pricing.

  • When identified, lung cancer is often found at an earlier stage
  • Earlier disgnosis often alow for less invasive treatment options
  • Risk of death to high-risk patients is greatly reduced
  • The exam is fast, painless, and noninvasive
  • Uses up to 90% less radiation than a conventional chest CT
  • No radiation remains in the body and no immediate side effects

  • False positive results - when a test appears to be abnormal but no lung cancer is found. May require additional testing
  • False negative results – when a test appears to be normal although lung cancer is present. May result in delayed care
  • May result in the detection and treatment of a cancer which may have never harmed you
  • Small risk of cancer from exposure to low dose radiation
  • May not improve health or life expectancy if the disease is in a later stage or has already spread beyond the lungs

Smoking and Lung Cancer

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths among both men and women. Of those, smoking contributes to 80% and 90% of lung cancer deaths in women and men, respectively.

Exposure to secondhand smoke causes approximately 7,330 lung cancer deaths among nonsmokers every year.

There’s no one right way to quit, but here are some requirements for quitting with success:

  • Make the decision to quit
  • Set a quit date & make a plan
  • Deal with withdrawal
  • Stay tobacco free

Some people can quit on their own, without help of others or the use of medicines. But for many smokers, it can be hard to break the social and emotional ties to smoking while getting over nicotine withdrawal symptoms at the same time. Fortunately, there are many sources of support available.

Proven Quitting Options:

  • Free telephone-based help to stop smoking
  • Programs and support groups
  • Support of family and friends
  • Nicotine replacement therapy
  • Prescription drugs

Find more information and resources in the American Cancer Society’s Guide to Quit Smoking

www.cancer.org/healthy/stayawayfromtobacco/guidetoquittingsmoking